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continuing education

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Fluid Therapy in Critical Care

Intravenous fluid administration is probably the most frequently used therapy in veterinary hospitals. Aggressive IV fluid resuscitation in emergent patients and continuous IV fluid administration in hospitalized patients have long been considered fundamental in the management of critically ill animals. However, research into whether the type and volume of fluids infused can contribute to comorbidities and decrease the chances of a favorable outcome continues. This article reviews new trends in fluid therapy in human and veterinary critical care medicine.

Managing Uveitis in Dogs and Cats

The causes of uveitis are numerous and often elusive. Educating clients on the potential complications of uncontrolled uveitis (cataracts, glaucoma, loss of vision, pain) greatly increases compliance with therapy and follow-up visits to maximize success.

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clinical medicine

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Managing Feline Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrinopathy in cats, with reported prevalence rates ranging from 0.4% to 1.2%. Factors related to the patient’s diet and adiposity and the presence of comorbid conditions (e.g., acromegaly, pancreatitis) likely contribute to the pathogenesis of feline DM as well as influence response to therapy and chances for achieving remission.

Surgical Drains: Indications, Types, and Complications

Surgical drains are implants that allow removal of fluid and/or gas from a wound or body cavity. This review is part 1 of a 2-part series. Part 1 covers indications for drain use, types, benefits and drawbacks of each type, and common complications. Part 2 will cover drain placement techniques and postoperative care.

Nutritional Management of Idiopathic Epilepsy in Dogs

Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurologic disorder encountered in small animal practice and is estimated to affect up to 0.75% of dogs in the general population. Evidence suggests that dietary therapy may have a beneficial effect on seizure control as well.

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columns

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Opportunities to Improve Outcomes in Arthritic Pets

Managing osteoarthritis, particularly in pets with excess weight, is not new to the veterinary profession; however, we found several opportunities exist to improve the care these affected pets receive. Quality medical management of OA requires a multi-faceted diagnostic and treatment plan—a combination of diagnostic testing, multi-modal pain management, and weight management must be considered to most effectively improve patient outcomes.

Move Your Practice and Mindset Forward

NAVC has launched three courses — the Human-Animal Bond Certification, the Pet Nutrition Coach and Certified Veterinary Business Leader. These courses are available online.

Work-Life Balance for Employees

We value members on the veterinary team who are passionate about their life’s work, but is it possible to create a workplace environment where the staff can devote themselves to their jobs at a very high level, and still have the energy and time to devote to the other, very important part of that equation—their lives outside of work?

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practitioners corner

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Alfaxalone: An Old Drug in a New Formulation

Alfaxalone has been used to induce general anesthesia for many years, but only recently has a new formulation with preservatives become available in the United States. This formulation has a shelf life of 28 days after first use. It is approved for IV administration to induce and maintain general anesthesia in dogs and cats; however, it is also used via the IM route for induction and sedation (off label).

The Importance of Elevating Veterinary Technicians

Banfield is invested in supporting credentialed veterinary technicians. In addition to increasing hourly pay and continuing education funding for all our veterinary technicians in 2018, Banfield is supporting the Veterinary Nurse Initiative.

Nutrition and Wound Healing

Wound healing requires the body to have sufficient energy stores to rebuild tissue. Without these resources, the animal's body begins to break down endogenous protein in an attempt to meet its needs for the “building blocks” of healing. A strategy to provide adequate nutrients should be created for every wound patient.

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