Feline Medicine

Features

Feline Medicine Sedation for Cats with Cardiovascular Disease

MINIMIZING ANESTHESIA RISKS There are no safe sedative or anesthetic drugs, just safe delivery practices. Cats represent a large part of the US pet population; as of 2012, the approximately 74.1 million cats outnumbered the approximately 69.9 million dogs in this country. Although these numbers represent an overall decline in dog and cat populations, the …

Features

Feline Medicine Pandora Syndrome in Cats: Diagnosis and Treatment

PRACTICING CAT FRIENDLY The articles presented by the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) focus on feline-specific information on cats’ unique behaviors; diagnosis and evaluation of disease and conditions; better approaches and techniques for cats; and strategies to decrease stress associated with the veterinary visit for cats, caregivers, and your team. LOWER URINARY SIGNS? Consider …

Features

Understanding the Cat

PRACTICING CAT FRIENDLY The articles presented by American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) focus on feline-specific information on cats’ unique behaviors; diagnosis and evaluation of disease and conditions; better approaches and techniques for cats; and strategies to decrease stress associated with the veterinary visit for cats, caregivers, and your team. BEHAVIORAL RESPONSES Cats caged against …

The Yellow Cat: Diagnostic & Therapeutic Strategies
CE Article

There is no mystery when it comes to a “yellow” cat. Icterus and jaundice—both of which describe a yellowish pigmentation of the skin—indicate hyperbilirubinemia, a 5- to 10-fold elevation in serum bilirubin concentration.

However, this is where the certainty ends and the diagnostic challenge begins. The icteric cat presentation is not a sensitive or specific marker of disease, despite the visually obvious and impressive clinical sign…

Feline Urethral Obstruction:
Diagnosis & Management

Feline UO is a treatable emergency, with a survival rate to discharge higher than 90%, despite the fact that it is potentially life threatening due to severe electrolyte and acid–base imbalances secondary to acute postrenal azotemia/uremia.

External tooth resorption in cats
Part 2: Therapeutic Approaches

Tooth resorption in cats is prevalent, affecting 28% to 68% of mature cats, depending on the population researched. One study found histologic evidence of resorption in all teeth among cats with at least one resorptive lesion; this led to the hypothesis that given enough time, all teeth of affected cats will develop tooth resorption.

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