Feline Medicine

The Yellow Cat: Diagnostic & Therapeutic Strategies
CE Article

There is no mystery when it comes to a “yellow” cat. Icterus and jaundice—both of which describe a yellowish pigmentation of the skin—indicate hyperbilirubinemia, a 5- to 10-fold elevation in serum bilirubin concentration.

However, this is where the certainty ends and the diagnostic challenge begins. The icteric cat presentation is not a sensitive or specific marker of disease, despite the visually obvious and impressive clinical sign…

Feline Urethral Obstruction:
Diagnosis & Management

Feline UO is a treatable emergency, with a survival rate to discharge higher than 90%, despite the fact that it is potentially life threatening due to severe electrolyte and acid–base imbalances secondary to acute postrenal azotemia/uremia.

External tooth resorption in cats
Part 2: Therapeutic Approaches

Tooth resorption in cats is prevalent, affecting 28% to 68% of mature cats, depending on the population researched. One study found histologic evidence of resorption in all teeth among cats with at least one resorptive lesion; this led to the hypothesis that given enough time, all teeth of affected cats will develop tooth resorption.

Feline Anesthesia & Analgesia
Recent Developments

There are approximately 74.1 million pet cats in the United States1 but, despite this popularity, anesthesia and analgesia remain challenging in cats. Surprisingly few anesthetic and analgesic products are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in cats, but several new products have become recently available. The v-gel provides a protected and secured airway, allowing use of positive pressure ventilation and administration of inhalant anesthetics without exposure to staff or the environment. It can also be used for emergency resuscitation if an endotracheal tube is not available.

External Tooth Resorption in Cats

Jan Bellows, DVM, diplomate AVDC & ABVP (Canine & Feline) All Pets Dental, Weston, Florida Tooth resorption in cats is prevalent, affecting 28% to 68% of mature cats, depending on the population researched.1 One study found histologic evidence of resorption in all teeth among cats with at least one clinically apparent resorption site; this led …

Consider This Case:
Senior Cat with Front Paw Swelling & Pain

Stephanie Apple, DVM Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine Sandra Diaz, DVM, MS, Diplomate ACVD Ohio State University A 15-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat presented with a 2-month history of progressive lameness, swelling, and pain in its right front paw. HISTORY The patient was an indoor only cat. No other animals in the household were …

MENU