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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-january-february-2022/

Essentials

2018 Veterinary Emerging Topics (VET)® Report: A Feline Focus on Antimicrobial Usage

Molly McAllister, DVM, MPH, VP Veterinary Science Banfield Pet Hospital From the Field shares insights from Banfield Pet Hospital veterinary team members. Drawing from the nationwide practice’s extensive research, as well as findings from its electronic veterinary medical records database and more than 8 million annual pet visits, this column is intended to explore topics …

See Ya Later, Alligator! The Hypoallergenic Diet to Aid Patients

Wouldn’t it benefit our allergic patients to be able to control their symptoms with diet and less, if any, medications? Clinically, presentations of food hypersensitivity appear the same as food intolerance, but immunologically they are different. Food allergy in pets has been described as early as 1920 yet the diagnosis is often elusive as it coexists 20-30% of the time with other allergies.

Beyond Borders: The Truth About Ticks

When dealing with most 3-host ticks, the problem is that the majority of the reproducing ticks are not on the dogs or cats, but on their natural wildlife hosts.

When dealing with most 3-host ticks, the problem is that the majority of the reproducing ticks are not on the dogs or cats, but on their natural wildlife hosts.

How Swiss Cheese is Helping Banfield Help Pets

Marissa Rothenbaum, DVM, Senior Manager of Veterinary Quality Banfield Pet Hospital From the Field shares insights from Banfield Pet Hospital veterinary team members. Drawing from the nationwide practice’s extensive research, as well as findings from its electronic veterinary medical records database and more than 8 million annual pet visits, this column is intended to explore …

Dealing With Dysrexia in Dogs and Cats

The mechanisms by which illness suppresses appetite are complex, and we do not yet have a clear picture of them all. The term dysrexia refers to a disruption in food intake, including anorexia (not eating), hyporexia (eating less) and eating an unbalanced diet. In addition to all the physiological consequences of poor food intake, this takes a toll on the pet owner and can lead to premature decisions about discontinuation of therapy or euthanasia.

Hitting the Road Heartworm-Free

To help veterinarians balance their dual role of protecting individual animal health and welfare as well as that of animal populations, the AHS and the Association of Shelter Veterinarians have formulated evidence-based best practices for minimizing transmission of heartworms in relocated dogs.

Nutritional Management for Gastrointestinal Disease in Dogs and Cats

Several gastrointestinal diets can help address GI disease in dogs and cats based on their nutritional components. A major consideration in choosing a diet is the digestibility of the nutrients.

Nutritional deficiencies commonly occur as a consequence of gastrointestinal disease. Special diets for GI disease in dogs and cats can be effective based on their nutritional components.

Focus on Overweight and Obesity in Cats

From the Field shares insights from Banfield Pet Hospital veterinary team members. Drawing from the nationwide practice’s extensive research, as well as findings from its electronic veterinary medical records database and more than 8 million annual pet visits, this column is intended to explore topics and spark conversations relevant to veterinary practices that ultimately help …

Wolbachia and Heartworm: Why Doxycycline Is Needed in Heartworm Treatment

Andy Moorhead, DVM, MS, PhD University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine The Heartworm Hotline column is presented in partnership between Today’s Veterinary Practice and the American Heartworm Society (heartwormsociety.org). The goal of the column is to communicate practical and timely information on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heartworm disease, as well as highlight current …

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