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New Study Shows Promise for Advancements in Canine Cancer Treatment

New Study Shows Promise for Advancements in Canine Cancer Treatment

A new treatment spearheaded by the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine (VMCVM) has yielded promising results.  It was announced that a first canine cancer patient is now cancer free after undergoing a new form of treatment.

The research team, led by Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiology Jeffrey Ruth, DVM, investigated focused ultrasound therapy techniques capable of noninvasively destroying tumors and stimulating a dog’s immune system to fight cancer. The team utilized a device developed by Theraclion, one that was originally intended for use in breast and thyroid treatments for humans.

The device, Echopulse®, was easily adapted for veterinary treatment due to its versatile robotic design.

“These canine tumors tend to occur on the limbs and may recur if they are not entirely removed. As a result, often amputation is required,” said Dr. Ruth. “It is our hope that focused ultrasound will add to current treatment options by providing a way to non-invasively ablate the mass and also trigger an anti-tumor immune response.”

The teams at Theraclion and VMCVM are determined to build on the success of this case.

For more information on the case, click here.

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