Anesthesiology

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Alfaxalone: An Old Drug in a New Formulation

Alfaxalone has been used to induce general anesthesia for many years, but only recently has a new formulation with preservatives become available in the United States. This formulation has a shelf life of 28 days after first use. It is approved for IV administration to induce and maintain general anesthesia in dogs and cats; however, it is also used via the IM route for induction and sedation (off label).

Essentials

Focus on Quality: New Tools to Support Patient Safety in Anesthesia

From the Field shares insights from Banfield Pet Hospital veterinary team members. Drawing from the nationwide practice’s extensive research, as well as findings from its electronic veterinary medical records database and more than 8 million annual pet visits, this column is intended to explore topics and spark conversations relevant to veterinary practices that ultimately help …

Features

Feline Medicine Sedation for Cats with Cardiovascular Disease

MINIMIZING ANESTHESIA RISKS There are no safe sedative or anesthetic drugs, just safe delivery practices. Cats represent a large part of the US pet population; as of 2012, the approximately 74.1 million cats outnumbered the approximately 69.9 million dogs in this country. Although these numbers represent an overall decline in dog and cat populations, the …

Banfield Pet Hospital Unveils New Anesthesia Program

Earlier this month, Banfield Pet Hospital introduced the newest edition of its anesthetic and pain management guidelines and protocols: Anesthesia and Analgesia for the Veterinary Practitioner: Canine and Feline. This edition is a continuation of 15 years of work, during which time Banfield has made its Anesthesia for the Pet Practitioner publication available online to …

Features

Feline Anesthesia & Analgesia: Recent Developments

There are approximately 74.1 million pet cats in the United States1 but, despite this popularity, anesthesia and analgesia remain challenging in cats. Surprisingly few anesthetic and analgesic products are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in cats, but several new products have become recently available. The v-gel provides a protected and secured airway, allowing use of positive pressure ventilation and administration of inhalant anesthetics without exposure to staff or the environment. It can also be used for emergency resuscitation if an endotracheal tube is not available.

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Local Anesthesia for the Distal Extremity

Heidi L. Shafford, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVAA Local anesthesia techniques are important analgesic tools. The author provides step-by-step instructions in providing IVRA and ring blocks to both dogs and cats. Local anesthetics block nerve impulses caused by painful stimuli, which makes them effective analgesics. Regional and peripheral blocks are versatile and can be applied to …

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