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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-july-august-2021/

Endocrinology

Desoxycorticosterone Pivalate for Dogs With Addison’s Disease

Research studies show that DOCP injectable suspension is a safe and effective therapy for dogs with Addison’s disease.

DOCP is a safe and effective mineralocorticoid replacement therapy when used in dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism. Further research is needed to better characterize clinically appropriate starting doses and evaluate the efficacy of the various dose adjustment and monitoring protocols used in clinical practice. 

treatment for pancreatitis in dogs

Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs

Severe forms of pancreatitis in dogs require aggressive supportive care and intensive hospitalization, with treatment including analgesia, nutritional management, antiemetics, and more.

Severe forms of pancreatitis in dogs require aggressive supportive care, with treatment including analgesia, nutritional management, antiemetics, and more.

Chronic Pancreatitis in Cats

Pancreatitis is common among cats, although its exact incidence is unknown. The disease can take several forms—acute, chronic, and acute on chronic (an episode of acute pancreatitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis)—and differentiating among the forms clinically and making an antemortem diagnosis in cats remain challenging.

Treatment of Pituitary-Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism in Dogs

PDH is the most common cause of spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome in dogs. Lifelong therapy is necessary to maintain wellness.

Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) is the most common cause of spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome in dogs. It is the result of the inappropriate secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by a pituitary adenoma.

Diagnosis and Management of Hypoadrenocorticism in Dogs

Primary hypoadrenocorticism, also known as Addison’s disease, is a syndrome caused by bilateral dysfunction of the adrenal cortices. Diagnosis can be difficult and management varies between Addison’s disease and atypical Addison’s disease.

Managing Feline Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrinopathy in cats, with reported prevalence rates ranging from 0.4% to 1.2%. Factors related to the patient’s diet and adiposity and the presence of comorbid conditions (e.g., acromegaly, pancreatitis) likely contribute to the pathogenesis of feline DM as well as influence response to therapy and chances for achieving remission.

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