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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-january-february-2022/

Euthanasia/End-of-Life Care

Caring for Clients at the End

Giving as much attention to the client as to the pet about to be euthanized can greatly affect the grieving process and outcome for everyone involved.

Clients remember the last moments they share with their pet. They remember how the veterinary team treated their pet and how we made them feel during those moments. 

entire veterinary hospital in the video game The Sims

Cornell Veterinary Euthanasia Course Wins Grand Prize in International Contest

Veterinary students at Cornell University can take an end-of-life class that helps them communicate with grief-stricken pet owners with compassion.

When performing euthanasia, veterinarians and staff have to manage both the end of an animal’s life and the pet owner’s grief, as well as their own distress. Students at Cornell University can take an end-of-life class that helps them navigate all these emotions and communicate with clients with compassion.

The Winter Holiday Season and Euthanasia Rates: The Unexpected Correlation

The holiday season is supposed to be a time for family and joy, but that can be hard when clients and veterinarians have to make the hard decision to euthanize a pet; an unfortunate reality around the holidays. Read more from Dr. Dani McVety, co-founder of Lap of Love Veterinary Hospice, on why and then watch the Spark! video for advice from Dr. Dana Varble on how to get through it.

euthanasia study

Study Looks at Veterinarian Attitudes Toward Euthanasia of Pets

Sometimes, pet owners elect to have their animals euthanized because they can’t or won’t pay for treatment. The other side of the coin is when the animal is suffering and treatment is futile but the owners refuse to consider euthanasia. A recent study showed that these issues cause moral distress for veterinarians.

Caring for Geriatric Pets in Your Practice

There is much we can do to help pets live comfortable lives as super seniors. Our ability to recognize and manage pain, anxiety, hygiene, and other signs that may affect quality of life has advanced in recent years.

Bridging the Gap Between Terminal Illness and Euthanasia

Don’t be afraid to discuss hospice and end-of-life options with clients. Owners are usually anxious and distressed when confronted with an aging pet and impending loss. The veterinary team can help these clients by asking about their expectations and fears as well as explaining the hospice process. It is important for owners to feel at peace when remembering the last few months of their pets’ lives.

Handling Euthanasia In Your Practice

Mary Gardner, DVM, and Dani McVety, DVM Lap of Love Veterinary Hospice, lapoflove.com We are not taught to be good at carrying out death: No one taught us how to walk into an examination room for a euthanasia appointment, what to say to a crying teenager, or whether to hug the elderly man who just …

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