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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-november-december-2021/

Feline/Feline Medicine

Uncovering the Cause of Fever in Cats

The normal body temperature range in cats is 38.1°C to 39.2°C (100.5°F–102.5°F). Fever of unknown origin (FUO) in cats is classified as a temperature higher than 39.7°C (103.5°F) measured at least 4 times in a 2-week period without an identified cause.

Feline Urethral Obstruction: Diagnosis & Management

Presentation, treatment, and relief for treating urethral obstruction (UO) in cats.

Feline UO is a treatable emergency, with a survival rate to discharge higher than 90%, despite the fact that it is potentially life threatening due to severe electrolyte and acid–base imbalances secondary to acute postrenal azotemia/uremia.

Feline Urinary Diseases

In each issue of Today’s Veterinary Practice, Pet Health by the Numbers correlates an article topic with statistics provided by Banfield Pet Hospital (banfield.com). These statistics are extracted from data collected from the medical records of nearly 2.5 million dogs and nearly 500,000 cats presented to more than 920 Banfield Pet Hospitals in 2015. The …

Feline Ocular Conditions

The following table outlines the prevalence of feline ocular diagnoses in cats presented to Banfield Pet Hospitals in 2014. Feline herpesvirus infections, and their ocular manifestations, are discussed in Runny Eyes: Feline Herpesvirus Infection. In each issue of Today’s Veterinary Practice, Pet Health by the Numbers correlates an article topic with statistics provided by Banfield …

Runny Eyes: Feline Herpesvirus Infection

The authors describe the anatomy of the feline conjunctiva and cornea, pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus, and ocular manifestations of the disease, including specific diagnosis and therapy.

External Tooth Resorption in Cats, Part 2: Therapeutic Approaches

Tooth resorption in cats is prevalent, affecting 28% to 68% of mature cats, depending on the population researched. One study found histologic evidence of resorption in all teeth among cats with at least one resorptive lesion; this led to the hypothesis that given enough time, all teeth of affected cats will develop tooth resorption.

Feline Anesthesia & Analgesia: Recent Developments

There are approximately 74.1 million pet cats in the United States1 but, despite this popularity, anesthesia and analgesia remain challenging in cats. Surprisingly few anesthetic and analgesic products are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in cats, but several new products have become recently available. The v-gel provides a protected and secured airway, allowing use of positive pressure ventilation and administration of inhalant anesthetics without exposure to staff or the environment. It can also be used for emergency resuscitation if an endotracheal tube is not available.

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