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January/February 2020

Whipworms in Dogs

Analyzing the clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of whipworms in dogs.

Analyzing the clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of whipworms in dogs, a common infectious agent.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Ocular Proptosis

Proptosis, or traumatic forward displacement of the globe out of the orbit, is a serious ocular emergency that requires immediate attention to minimize discomfort and damage to the eye.

diagnosis pancreatitis in dogs

Diagnosing Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs

Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs is made based on a combination of presenting clinical signs, serology, abdominal ultrasonography findings, and response to medical therapy.

Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs is made based on a combination of presenting clinical signs, serology, abdominal ultrasonography findings, and response to medical therapy.

Diving In: Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Veterinary Medicine

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the therapeutic administration of oxygen administered at a pressure that exceeds that at sea level.This article provides a brief overview of the mechanism of action, veterinary applications and evidence, and general treatment mechanics associated with HBOT administration.

Oral Cyclosporine Use in Dogs

Oral cyclosporine is currently being used to treat a spectrum of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases in dogs.

Cyclosporine is a potent immunosuppressive agent that has treatment applications in both veterinary and human medicine. Oral cyclosporine is currently being used to treat a spectrum of inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases in dogs, including but not limited to atopic dermatitis, autoimmune skin disorders, perianal fistula, inflammatory bowel disease, granulomatous meningoencephalitis, and immune-mediated blood disorders.

Current Concepts in Periodontal Disease

Of the most common health problems of companion animals throughout their life, dental disease stands out as the number 1 concern. Sadly, many owners and veterinarians still misunderstand the significant effects of periodontal disease, believing them to be limited to bad breath and tooth loss. This lack of understanding, combined with improper or outdated diagnostic methods, can lead to delayed therapy at best and misdiagnosis at worst. Intervention by veterinarians and educated owners is the only solution to improving health and alleviating distress in these patients.

The Cost of Caring Too Much?

Veterinarians are in the unique and challenging position of balancing the medical needs of their patients with the financial needs of their clients. The strength of the human-animal bond can lead to emotionally charged conversations between pet owners and veterinarians, especially when finances are limited and decisions about care become life-or-death.

Table of Contents: January/February 2020

Want to view the full digital issue? Click here. Features CONTINUING EDUCATION Tooth Extraction Complications in Dogs and Cats Cindy Charlier, DVM, DAVDC VDENT (Veterinary Dental Education, Networking and Training), Elgin, Ill. The goal with all extractions is to extract the entire tooth and root without damage to surrounding structures. Unfortunately, complications do occur. Learn …

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