March/April 2016 Archives | Today's Veterinary Practice
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March/April 2016

Table of Contents: March/April 2016

Want to view the the full digital issue? Click here. Features Feline Anesthesia & Analgesia: Recent Developments Kristen Messenger, DVM, Diplomate ACVAA & ACVCP North Carolina State University Canine Pituitary Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism Series – Part 3: Current & Investigative Options for Therapy David Bruyette, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, Los Angeles, …

Integrative Medicine: The Evidence, Economics, & Logistics of an Emerging Field

Veterinary clients are increasingly concerned about maximizing the health and wellness of their pets. An estimated $16 billion is spent annually on veterinary care for companion animals,1 and owners and veterinary insurers are pursuing therapies traditionally regarded as alternative and complementary. These therapies may also be increasingly recommended by the veterinary care team.

Coming to You from the American Heartworm Society

While heartworm education is a year-round focus of the American Heartworm Society (AHS), many veterinary practices put extra emphasis on heartworm prevention and education in the spring, especially since April is National Heartworm Awareness Month. Therefore, it’s a good time to consider the many resources available to veterinary practices from the AHS.

Canine Gait Analysis

Gait evaluation typically includes visual and/or subjective observation of the dog from a number of angles at both the walk and trot on a flat surface. To the trained eye, lameness can often be detected upon gait evaluation. However, a more subtle lameness may not be apparent on subjective gait evaluation and can be difficult to detect.

External Tooth Resorption in Cats, Part 2: Therapeutic Approaches

Tooth resorption in cats is prevalent, affecting 28% to 68% of mature cats, depending on the population researched. One study found histologic evidence of resorption in all teeth among cats with at least one resorptive lesion; this led to the hypothesis that given enough time, all teeth of affected cats will develop tooth resorption.

Glycemic Control of Hospitalized Diabetic Patients

Glycemic control in diabetic dogs and cats may be jeopardized by hospitalization for treatment of diabetic or nondiabetic disorders or routine health care interventions, such as minor surgical procedures or dental prophylaxis. Thus, a major challenge for veterinarians caring for established diabetics in the hospital is to provide needed care while avoiding significant disruption of glucose control. This article provides useful strategies and techniques for in-hospital glucose management in established stable diabetics.

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