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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-september-october-2021/

Dermatology

Review of Pemphigus Foliaceus in Dogs and Cats

Most cases of pemphigus foliaceus are presumed to be idiopathic. Immunosuppressive drugs are the most common treatment, and while recurrence is common, prognosis is fair to good.

Pemphigus foliaceus is the most common autoimmune skin disease in dogs and cats. The prognosis for dogs with PF is fair and for cats is good; however, recurrence is common. 

Dermatophytoses in Dogs and Cats

Dermatophytoses have a variety of clinical presentations, and a step-by-step logical approach is crucial for proper diagnosis.

Dermatophytosis is a zoonotic but curable disease. Establishing whether a patient is completely cured should be supported by a combination of resolution of clinical signs and negative culture. 

Treating Otitis Externa in Dogs

Ear cytology is a quick way to confirm infection and the degree of inflammation for patients with suspected otitis externa.

Half the battle of treating otitis externa is figuring out the underlying cause and type. Once that is achieved, client education and compliance are key to managing it.

Diagnostic Approach to the Pruritic Dog

There are many differential diagnoses for pruritus in dogs, but following a few guidelines in the correct order can greatly facilitate the workup.

A pruritic work-up should include getting a thorough history, eliminating infectious or parasitic causes before leaping into an allergic skin disease assessment, and leaving atopic dermatitis as a last-resort diagnosis.

A Clinical Approach to Alopecia in Cats

The workup of alopecia in cats involves a combination of thorough history, categorization, and use of targeted investigative techniques.

The workup of alopecia in cats involves a combination of thorough history, categorization, and use of targeted investigative techniques. Although there are a large number of differential diagnoses for feline alopecia, a very large proportion of these differentials can be identified or excluded by using a relatively small number of inexpensive, rapid, and easy diagnostic techniques. 

Treating Canine Superficial Pyoderma in the Era of Antimicrobial Resistance

Veterinarians can help reduce antimicrobial resistance by taking a measured approach and reducing the use of antimicrobials, especially systemic antimicrobials.

Veterinarians can help reduce antimicrobial resistance by taking a measured approach and reducing the use of antimicrobials, especially systemic antimicrobials.

Skin Fold Dermatitis (Intertrigo) in Dogs

Intertrigo, or skin fold dermatitis, is caused by frictional trauma resulting in inflammation and/or microbial overgrowth of closely apposed skin surfaces. Resolution is commonly achieved with topical treatment.

Canine Atopic Dermatitis: Updates on Diagnosis and Treatment

Canine atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder defined as a hereditary predisposition to develop pruritic inflammatory skin disease associated with IgE antibodies, which typically target environmental allergens. The disease typically affects dogs age 6 months to 3 years and is characterized by pruritus and secondary skin lesions of a characteristic distribution around the face (mouth, eyes), concave aspect of the ear pinnae, ventral abdomen, flexor aspects of elbow, carpal, and tarsal joints, interdigital skin, and perineal area. This article will help practitioners determine which flare factors (or environmental conditions) are responsible for CAD.

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