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https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/table-of-contents-january-february-2022/

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Diagnosis and Treatment of Ocular Proptosis

Proptosis, or traumatic forward displacement of the globe out of the orbit, is a serious ocular emergency that requires immediate attention to minimize discomfort and damage to the eye.

diagnosis pancreatitis in dogs

Diagnosing Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs

Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs is made based on a combination of presenting clinical signs, serology, abdominal ultrasonography findings, and response to medical therapy.

Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs is made based on a combination of presenting clinical signs, serology, abdominal ultrasonography findings, and response to medical therapy.

Tooth Extraction Complications in Dogs and Cats

Recognizing potential complications that can occur during tooth extraction and learning treatment methods can help minimize pain and discomfort for our patients.

One of the most commonly performed oral surgery procedures in general practice is exodontia, or tooth extraction. Completing extractions in a consistent, orderly manner will decrease the incidence of complications.

Skin Fold Dermatitis (Intertrigo) in Dogs

Intertrigo, or skin fold dermatitis, is caused by frictional trauma resulting in inflammation and/or microbial overgrowth of closely apposed skin surfaces. Resolution is commonly achieved with topical treatment.

Diagnosing and Managing Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is a general term used to describe conditions affecting the bladder or urethra of cats; it is not a syndrome or specific diagnosis. It has been reported that between 4.5% and 8% of cats presenting to veterinary practices or teaching hospitals have FLUTD.

Canine Immune-Mediated Polyarthritis: Meeting the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges

Immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is an important condition to recognize in dogs. Treatment of IMPA is significantly different than treatment of many other conditions that may present with similar clinical signs, and protocols may vary between patients. Therefore, making an accurate diagnosis is critical. This article identifies some of the key considerations for establishing the diagnosis and making appropriate treatment plans for dogs with IMPA.

Treatment of Pituitary-Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism in Dogs

PDH is the most common cause of spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome in dogs. Lifelong therapy is necessary to maintain wellness.

Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) is the most common cause of spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome in dogs. It is the result of the inappropriate secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by a pituitary adenoma.

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